Favorite films

  • Possession
  • The Texas Chain Saw Massacre
  • The Shining
  • Alien

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  • The Night House

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  • Cannibal Holocaust

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  • Muriel's Wedding

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  • Malignant

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Recent reviews

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  • The Night House

    The Night House

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    A very good-looking haunted house mystery with a good plot that unfortunately trips itself up in the end. Rebecca Hall is absolutely, undeniably wonderful in this (although I may be biased as a fan of hers), David Bruckner directs with a steady hand, and the sound and set design, along with the cinematography, are impressive.

    My only complaint is that the film sets up a very interesting, fresh and engaging premise, only to fall back on lack-lustre tropes that, at…

  • Cannibal Holocaust

    Cannibal Holocaust

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    Cannibalism is the least of your worries going into this 80’s grindhouse found-footage horror. It is grim, it is grimy, and it is unrelenting.

    The images of grotesquerie you’ll find here are disturbing, but it is surprising in its attempts to comment on violence and spectacle, and ultimately calls to attention our participation as voyeurs to these heinous acts, likening the audience to the creators.

    Who are the cannibals, indeed?

    A friend highlighted the lens where this film is a…

Popular reviews

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  • Aguirre, the Wrath of God

    Aguirre, the Wrath of God

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    We begin with a symphonic chorus, pan down from the clouds to the lush greenness of the Amazonian landscape to see our band of explorers, wholly inorganic, struggling step-by-step down the treacherous path to darkness. In Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God we are treated to a physical, psychological, and spiritual trial of man that is as powerful as it is unnerving. Delivering a more quiet and contemplative vision than I expected, this film expertly explores the hubris of man…

  • The Empty Man

    The Empty Man

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    This horror flick starts with a real bang but sadly ends in a confused fizzle. Where the imagery, the horror, and the setting of the prologue is as clear, simple, and terrifyingly crisp as the thin Bhutanese air where we meet our opening quartet, the last half of the film spirals away from classic horror opting for more mystery and thriller, losing its edge.

    Don’t get me wrong, this film has its moments. The performances, the cinematography, and the scares…