spap1

spap1

Favorite films

  • My Dinner with Andre
  • Synecdoche, New York
  • Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles
  • Meantime

Recent activity

All
  • Bed and Board

    ★★★★

  • The Panic in Needle Park

    ★★★★

  • Rome, Open City

    ★★★★

  • Equinox Flower

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Bed and Board

    Bed and Board

    ★★★★

    the creeping up of adulthood in the sense that it is lingering around you constantly. 

    as adulthood creeps up on you, your responsibilities move from the size of a small courtyard to become that of the entire world. 

    the film itself seems to exhibit the struggles that an artist may face in that transition to adulthood. the mere facts of life such as money, rent, and stability in work etc. may all seem so trivial and unimportant as you search…

  • The Panic in Needle Park

    The Panic in Needle Park

    ★★★★

    our lives mean a great deal, to us. 

    to anyone else we may be a passing body in the street, a face they wish to avoid looking at, a brief but comforting smile on the train, but we mean nothing to them, absolutely nothing. 

    in this life we are tossed obstacles by the da in matters of work, of relationships, desires, yet each and every one of those are to be dealt with alone. why? because that is exactly the…

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  • Rome, Open City

    Rome, Open City

    ★★★★

    in doing what could be considered to have ushered in the beginnings of the Italian neorealist movement, Roberto Rossellini created a masterpiece of world cinema. 

    the introduction to this documentary-style filmmaking, allowing those real feelings of horror to seep their way into the realities of true-fiction, creating this effect that you are truly watching the suffering that is occurring before you. 

    i think what is most beautiful, yet obviously very difficult and heartbreaking to watch, is the relentlessness of the…

  • The Long Goodbye

    The Long Goodbye

    ★★★★½

    what lies at the heart, and remains most important, about this film, is the matter of its de-romanticisation of the detective/crime genre by attacking general conventions of the noir genre itself.

    in this sense it presents the apathetic, but strangely morally correct character Philip Marlowe - played by Elliott Gould in probably his best role i’ve ever seen. not to mention it being the best he’s ever looked - but the film makes no apologies for any aggression and endeavours…