Rane has written 8 reviews for films rated ★★★ during 2015.

  • The Hateful Eight

    The Hateful Eight

    ★★★

    First impression: A film that's as antiquated in its sensibilities as its intended format. (The 70mm is (as self-described) glorious, but never feels more than self-serving)

  • Steve Jobs

    Steve Jobs

    ★★★

    STEVE JOBS exists as the rare biopic that, in both content and form, accurately reflects the characteristics of its subject: engaging in small doses with admirable intentions, but overall deeply flawed. The movie earns bonus points for simply rejecting typical narrative avenues common in contemporary biopics, asserting its atypical structure (all three acts each focusing on a project launch with a number of years passing in-between) with the rare flashback inserted when needed. Likewise, Aaron Sorkin's screenplay makes the wise…

  • Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith

    Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith

    ★★★

    It's unfortunate that it took George Lucas two attempts before remembering how to make a Star Wars movie. From the opening space battle to the final confrontation between Obi-Wan and Anakin, this film manages to rekindle a lot of the fun adventure and spiritual mythos of the original trilogy. There's a lot of welcome improvement here over the first two episodes, and even some unexpected expansion of Star Wars lore, particularly in regards to the Dark Side. That being said,…

  • Gods and Monsters

    Gods and Monsters

    ★★★

    Both buoyed by and drowning in Ian McKellen's overflowing charm, GODS AND MONSTERS manages to keep itself entertaining for most of its run-time, but at the cost of any thematic subtlety or coherence.

  • Shadows

    Shadows

    ★★★

    A messy, scattershot photograph of a film that manages to depict race relations in 50's New York without making it a "thing." Also, how is this the first Cassavetes film I've ever seen??

  • Ant-Man

    Ant-Man

    ★★★

    More like Ant-Meh, amirite?

  • Turbo Kid

    Turbo Kid

    ★★★

    Cheap and silly, but not always in a bad way. Seen at LRFF 2015

  • While We're Young

    While We're Young

    ★★★

    While this film tries to say something about societal expectations of adulthood, pretentious youth culture and even the value of truth in nonfiction film, it ultimately says very little. Entertaining, though.