the andalusian kat

the andalusian kat

pulp, trash and spaghetti

and surrealism

and other things too

Favorite films

  • Return of the Living Dead III
  • That Obscure Object of Desire
  • The Iron Rose
  • The Great Silence

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  • Prisoners of the Ghostland

    ★★½

  • Don't Breathe 2

    ★★★

  • Fiancée of Dracula

    ★★★

  • Fury of Johnny Kid

    ★★★

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  • Don't Breathe 2

    Don't Breathe 2

    ★★★

    Violent pulp. Not very moral and not very smart. Quite tense, wonderfully shot, with properly distinctive characters. When the Blind Man takes a machette it feels like 'Blind Fury' on exploitation steroids. So much B-grade fun. Yes, I would happily watch part three.

    PS. The title is kinda wrong. Silence is not significant anymore.

  • Fury of Johnny Kid

    Fury of Johnny Kid

    ★★★

    The 'Romeo and Juliet' of the spaghetti western starts not very Shakespearean, but quite cool nonetheless, with religious-like approach to the shooting lessons and a nice father-son relationship between a rebel teenager and an old criminal (having a hook instead of one hand!). When Giulietta finally appears - which takes place after over 30 minutes of the film - the story becomes romantic, obviously, yet remains very sexist, treating her character as a 'dumb broad' in love, and therefore making…

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  • The Wolf of Snow Hollow

    The Wolf of Snow Hollow

    ★★★½

    'Fargo' with a werewolf. Kind of. Devoid of the brilliance of the Coens, but offering a pretty convincing mix of bitterness, irony and goofiness.

  • Maciste

    Maciste

    What makes it particularly interesting is its intertextuality and historical context, i.e. making Maciste a contemporary actor named Maciste and playing Maciste (!!!) in the proto-peplum historical epic, BUT keeping his superhero abilities in 'the real life' so he could stay Maciste/powerful enough to save lives of the innocents even outside of the cinema screen. And if that's not enough (of Maciste within Maciste), the film apparently promotes the Italian nationalism making the muscled body (and equally perfect soul) of the hero a symbol of the nation's noblety and strength.