Favorite films

  • Carrie
  • Heathers
  • Hocus Pocus
  • Scream

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  • Freeway II: Confessions of a Trickbaby

    ★★★

  • Freeway

    ★★★★

  • Blood & Flesh: The Reel Life & Ghastly Death of Al Adamson

    ★★★★

  • Mylène Farmer: 2019 - Le Film

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Freeway II: Confessions of a Trickbaby

    Freeway II: Confessions of a Trickbaby

    ★★★

    Like an even lower-budgeted version of its own predecessor, “Freeway II” is an acidic, gritty and undeniably funny (not in a haha way, in a ‘oh goodness that’s dark’ way) comedy/thriller about the social consequences of rampant child abuse. Natasha Lyonne is absolutely perfect as White Girl, a troubled teenager with an acerbic sense of humor who, while facing a lifetime prison sentence, escapes from a juvenile center with Cyclona (Maria Celedonio), a schizophrenic underage serial killer bent on reaching…

  • Freeway

    Freeway

    ★★★★

    When I first saw “Freeway” in high school, I didn’t quite know what I had just watched but I knew it was weirdly compelling, and it led me to the works of cult director Gregg Araki. So, if you’re into movies like “The Doom Generation” and “Nowhere,” you shouldn’t let this movie’s A-list cast discourage you from expecting an absolutely demented, screamingly politically incorrect dark comedy that practically dares you to shut it off. I mean, not a lot of…

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  • Saint Maud

    Saint Maud

    ★★★★

    This exploration of the intersection between hypervigilant-but-misguided devotion and the root causes of social anxiety joins the growing pantheon of brilliant new horror movies coming out of studio A24, like “Hereditary” and “The Witch.” Like those other movies (as well as Roman Polanski’s oppressive “The Tenant”), it has a rather claustrophobic vibe, which allows the audience to focus on the dynamics being established among the characters and how they’re impacted by lead character Maud’s growing confusion over her own faith.…

  • The Father

    The Father

    ★★★★

    I was only passingly interested in “The Father,” but I’ll be honest: From the moment it began, I was completely enraptured by its unfolding drama. Imagine a combination of Michael Haneke’s “Amour” and 2014’s “Still Alice”: We spend the entire movie in the company of Anthony Hopkins, who wanders from room to room in a London flat, losing himself in increasingly shambled, confused memories as we watch the impact of his psychological deterioration on those around him, in particular daughter…