Favorite films

  • Dr. No
  • Goldfinger
  • Never Say Never Again
  • Casino Royale

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  • Bloody Hell

    ★★

  • Axcellerator

    ★★

  • Spirited Away

    ★★★★★

  • The Time Machine

    ★★

Recent reviews

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  • Bloody Hell

    Bloody Hell

    ★★

    Bloody Hell was the fourth film from Australian director Alister Grierson. Grierson had previously made the war film Kokoda, the James Cameron-produced spelunking survival film Sanctum, and the sports film Tiger, all non-genre works.

    It took me a long time to get a handle on Bloody Hell. This is in large part because the film comes with a long preamble and gives no clear idea where it is going. The first fifteen minutes are taken up by the story of…

  • Axcellerator

    Axcellerator

    ★★

    Axcellerator is a film set around a gimmick idea – someone with a device that allows them to teleport. It’s a magical McGuffin film – one where somebody gets a device that gives them abilities and the rest of the film is spent running around trying to avoid the resident bad guys amid various novelty deployments of the device. This is something that usually gets played out as a kid’s film – see the likes of Alien Arsenal, Clockstoppers, Time…

Popular reviews

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  • Lady in a Cage

    Lady in a Cage

    ★★★½

    Lady in a Cage is often placed – erroneously so – in the 1960s mini-genre of Batty Old Dames thrillers that began with What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?. It has a number of nominal similarities to these films – it features a middle-aged former Hollywood star past her prime cast in a deliberately unglamorous role and taps into this genre’s frequent theme of their home as a world rooted in the past, festering with repressions and a refusal to…

  • Queen of the Damned

    Queen of the Damned

    Anne Rice’s The Vampire Chronicles books, begun with Interview with the Vampire, have developed a cult appeal that has grown to mainstream popularity. Although Rice’s work has increasingly slipped into formula, her vampire stories and other works show no signs of tapering off in appeal. The secret of Rice’s success is less to do with vampires and any of the other horror elements she co-opts as it is to do with a hyper-romanticised homosexual eroticism. This is a facet that…