Favorite films

  • Magnolia
  • Once Upon a Time in the West
  • Run Lola Run
  • Father of My Children

Recent activity

All
  • The Obscure Life of the Grand Duke of Corsica

    ★★★

  • Wildfire

    ★★★

  • New Order

    ★★½

  • The Chair

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

More
  • The Obscure Life of the Grand Duke of Corsica

    The Obscure Life of the Grand Duke of Corsica

    ★★★

    Tips a plumed hat towards Peter Greenaway, casting Timothy Spall in what instantly resembles a post-Brexit update of the Brian Dennehy role in 1987’s "The Belly of an Architect". There’s a lot of vomit, and the film is something of a splurge itself, pebble-dashing the screen with ideas. Yet its better ones stick: whether new or regurgitated, the constituent elements are forever intriguing, even if Graham only partially pulls them together at the last... As with Greenaway, the inbuilt ripeness may repel some viewers, and certain themes go under-metabolised, but it’s reassuring to see someone still tossing out curveballs like this.

  • Wildfire

    Wildfire

    ★★★

    Much of the evidence suggests Brady is a fine director of actors and emotion; as a screenwriter, though, she's not quite there yet... Certain aspects feel underdeveloped, like Lauren's rotely antagonistic relationship with her other half. And I fear some viewers are bound to find the final moments anticlimactic - although even here Brady gestures towards something constructive: putting on a handbrake as a new way to negotiate the same old Troubles. What kept me interested was the film's vision…

Popular reviews

More
  • Tenet

    Tenet

    ★★½

    The film that confirms Nolan no longer has any interest in human beings beyond assets on a poster or dots on a diagram... Visually and spiritually grey, it's too terse to relax and have a moment's fun with its premise; it's a caper for shut-ins, which may not stop it from becoming a runaway smash.

  • Beginning

    Beginning

    ★★

    Strikingly composed and rehearsed: it has to be, given the nature of some of those atrocities. Yet like a lot of films by young filmmakers who've seen a lot of films (and a lot of the New Extreme Cinema, in particular), it appears, scene by scene, utterly removed from life as it's actually experienced by real, non-movie, flesh-and-blood people; from first frame to last, we're watching terrible things happening to crash-test-dummy characters in one of those rigorously self-sealed art-movie vacuums.