Favorite films

  • Don't Look Now
  • Ali: Fear Eats the Soul
  • The Friends of Eddie Coyle
  • Brain Damage

Recent activity

All
  • Everlasting Moments

    ★★★★½

  • 13 Going on 30

    ★★½

  • Red Desert

    ★★★★★

  • N.U.

    ★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Everlasting Moments

    Everlasting Moments

    ★★★★½

    Absurd how so few people have seen Everlasting Moments on this crazy website. I mean, it took me a while to throw it on, but come on! Is this the least viewed film in the entire Criterion Collection? Broadly, it tells the story of a working-class family in turn-of-the-century Sweden. It's episodic and cyclical, not afraid to skip over the dramatic in favour of quieter moments layered with meaning, and alert to broader issues of gender, class, and politics without…

  • 13 Going on 30

    13 Going on 30

    ★★½

    Since I'm on my own in a new city, my partner suggested that I take a break from the end-of-semester crunch and watch this to celebrate turning 30. Absurd! The movie falls apart under the slightest bit of scrutiny. Jennifer's Garner's interpretation of a thirteen-year-old consists of two modes, excited and dumb, and she goes way too hard on both counts. Her character's suggestion to rebrand her trashy magazine as some kind of wholesome yearbook, which is lauded by literally…

Popular reviews

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  • Yojimbo

    Yojimbo

    ★★★★

    Having seen many of the great films carrying Yojimbo's DNA, I can't deny that Kurosawa's vision leaves a slightly diminished impression. Still, that cinematic genealogy remains fascinating. A distinctly (definitionally?) American genre lands in Japan and influences the course of chanbara filmmaking, which then goes on to influence how Italian filmmakers appropriate and redefine the Western. Yojimbo isn't the seed for that process—that'd be John Ford, I think—but it's a pivotal moment in the history of world cinema. And it's…

  • Red Desert

    Red Desert

    ★★★★★

    I'm not sure there's another movie that I simultaneously love so much and understand so little about as Michelangelo Antonioni's Red Desert. It kind of presents as intellectual, but—at least for me—works on such an intuitive level that I'm always drawn back to the creeping sense of alienation that permeates its world. It makes reality strange. Right from the film's first moments, in which Giuliana follows her son through a poisoned landscape, buys a half-eaten sandwich from a baffled worker,…