• Seaspiracy

    Seaspiracy

    ★½

    This is the world we live in: someone watched The Cove, Blackfish and Mission Blue (and a handful of others) and in a true TikTok fashion decided to re-enact what he saw. Only worse. I suppose if you are a teenager and this is your first documentary about this subject, then this movie might mean something to you. But it is for the most part a rehash of ideas previously told by much better filmmakers and much more daring activists.…

  • Lady in the Water

    Lady in the Water

    ★★★★

    Clumsy as it may have been received as, this modern-day deconstructed fairy tale is, quite frankly, one of the most earnest films in Shyamalan’s entire catalogue and – most crucially – it is the only one to use its meta elements to help the viewers make sense of who Shyamalan is as a storyteller and what he wants his movies to achieve.

    Have a look at my latest piece I penned for CLAPPER where I wrote about the connective tissue…

  • Stranger in Our House

    Stranger in Our House

    ★★

    Even though it takes a keen eye to notice these blink-and-you’ll-miss-it thematic nodes peering out of the veritable swamp of mediocrity that constitutes the bulk of the film, Summer of Fear is understandably a film Wes Craven would gravitate towards based on his prior interests.

    Read my full take over at Flasz on Film.

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  • Free Fire

    Free Fire

    ★★½

    Free Fire is a cinematic equivalent of a Lenny Kravitz song: it looks like it has a soul steeped in the sweltering 70s and tortured by great ideas, but in reality it is nothing more than a pop gimmick riding the line of the least resistance.

    For more thoughts on this film listen to the new episode of The Uncut Gems Podcast (available here)

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  • Minari

    Minari

    ★★★★★

    In short, the film uses its story about a family trying to reduce the American Dream to practice through sheer hard work and determination whilst juggling between seemingly opposing desires, one to assimilate into their adoptive environment and the other to preserve the cultural roots that brought them into this world, as a panoramic canvas upon which a sun-drenched and moody pastoral is painted with a combination of broad emotional strokes and perfectly dotted details giving the whole piece its…

  • A Good Year

    A Good Year

    ★★½

    A Good Year is nothing more than a curiosity, an anomalous data point in Ridley Scott's directorial catalogue. In some respect it is commendable he tried to widen his horizons and handle a story that was quite readily outside of his wheelhouse, but he may have proved he wasn't able to attune himself to the material. Thus, this is a rare example of a movie about people falling in love in the South of France and drinking wine as they…

  • Spirit Untamed

    Spirit Untamed

    ★★★½

    [...] scrolling through reviews of Spirit Untamed can quickly sieve out people who see themselves as critics but are merely pound-shop influencers who don’t understand they do not have a responsibility towards the film they are dispensing opinion on, but to their reader/viewer/listener. And they should damn well be able to figure out that movies about horses and friendship are probably made with children in mind. 

    Read my full rant over at Flasz on Film.

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  • Captive State

    Captive State

    ★★★★

    There must be some kind of a saucy story behind this film's cinematic release in the UK. I remember vividly seeing marketing plastered all over the Odeon website and then only a handful of cinemas were listed (ahead of the release) among the ones showing it. And then... the movie was pulled altogether. Not only that, it took quite a long time for it to become available in the UK at all (meanwhile it was possible to import it physically…

  • That Touch of Mink

    That Touch of Mink

    ★★

    That Touch of Mink reminded me of Charlie Chaplin’s The Countess from Hong Kong in that it felt like a movie that would have worked better in the 1930s or even 1940s. It has the aspirations of a prototypical screwball comedy, its views on gender roles and subversion thereof are also accurately outdated. And if they had made it twenty or thirty years earlier, Cary Grant would have been much younger too. Though, someone else would have to substitute for…

  • Candyman

    Candyman

    ★★★★

    Like an image in a funhouse mirror, this new rendition of Candyman exaggerates certain aspects of the image it is reflecting, diminishes some others, and some it leaves somewhat blurred. Therefore, it is incredibly hard to assess whether the film successfully lives up to the legacy of the original, as it seemingly purposefully makes alterations to the way its structural makeup is perceived.

    Read my full review over at Flasz on Film

    Read my article titled "The Implicit Irony of the New Candyman" over at Flasz on Film.

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  • The Night House

    The Night House

    ★★★★½

    The Night House is a surprisingly powerful piece of genre filmmaking that keeps the viewer engaged both intellectually and emotionally.

    Read my full review over at Flasz on Film.

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  • Anna

    Anna

    Many filmmakers repeatedly return to revisit the same themes and - as Rainer Werner Fassbinder once put it - effectively end up making the same film over and over again. Spielberg used to gravitate to paternal abandonment, De Palma to voyeurism, Scorsese to religion. Meanwhile, Luc Besson seemed obsessed with the idea of a female superhero from the very onset of his directorial career.

    From Nikita to Lucy, he would frequently return to the well in search for new angles…