Jack Braun

Future film critic/asshole 😃

Favorite films

  • Shaun of the Dead
  • Hot Fuzz
  • Baby Driver
  • Garth Marenghi's Darkplace

Recent activity

All
  • Sicario

    ★★★½

  • Enemy

    ★★★★½

  • Prisoners

    ★★★★½

  • Halloween Kills

    ★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Sicario

    Sicario

    ★★★½

    “Sicario” (2015), is nightmarishly authentic! A savagely deep inspection on the modern-day barbarity of the drug trade. Denis Villenueve proves once again that he can take any subject matter and find a way to utilize his craft to make an undeniably compelling spectacle. His focus on both the procedural and criminal angle of the American/Mexican drug war opens up many doors for riveting tension. The uneasy tone and explosive atmosphere lingers throughout the film’s spanning setting. The ensemble of performances…

  • Enemy

    Enemy

    ★★★★½

    “Enemy” (2013), is a mesmerizing, confounding, and vastly transfixing tale that is guaranteed to leave you in one of the most startlingly unnerving states of bafflement once its credits begin to role, and as yet another installment into Denis Villenueve’s utterly fantastic filmography, he decides to venture back into Canadian territory to bring forth a narrative that exists on one of the most intriguingly multifaceted levels of symbolism that can ever be interpreted, and though this story feels as if…

Popular reviews

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  • No Time to Die

    No Time to Die

    ★★★★

    “No Time to Die” (2021), is a colossal, impactful, and spectacularly necessary conclusion to Daniel Craig’s unforgettable tenure as the memorably charismatic character of James Bond, and as the final climactic chapter of this particular era for the franchise, it is delivered with such a fantastic drive of both action and drama, and although the monolithic runtime of 2 hours and 43 minutes does present cause for worry in terms of pacing and investment, this film mostly does an excellent…

  • Planes, Trains and Automobiles

    Planes, Trains and Automobiles

    ★★★★

    “Planes, Trains & Automobiles” (1987), is a warming, humble, and effortlessly wonderful tale that lovingly embellishes the peculiarly inviting style of John Hughes’ attention towards storytelling and filmmaking, and at the heart of one of his most unforgettable features is a fantastically entertaining and beautifully moving telling that oozes with a frantically kinetic energy set against the backdrop of Thanksgiving, and this film never once ceases to bring forth a phenomenally jocular presence as Hughes’ quintessential techniques take hold to demonstrate…