• Magic

    Magic

    ★★★★

    It's amazing how a rewatch can crystallise your thoughts on a film. The second time around with Magic, and I found the portrayal of mental illness profoundly affecting. More than the psychological horror elements, more than the fact that Ann-Margaret was younger than me when they filmed this, more than that intense Jerry Goldsmith score... this movie is really fucking sad.

    We'll be covering Magic, along with Magic Mike and The Smurfs and the Magic Flute on the February 17th episode of the Sudden Double Deep podcast. On our show we watch three films linked by a word in the title.

    Come find us!
    linktr.ee/sddfilmpodcast

  • Magic Mike

    Magic Mike

    ★★★★

    A super-solid, straight story that reminded me of Cocktail, of all things. Love how much Sodderbergh does his best to hide Kevin Nash's dancing prowess, much like the backing lemurs in a boyband.

    We'll be covering Magic Mike, along with Richard Attenborough's Magic and The Smurfs and the Magic Flute on the February 17th episode of the Sudden Double Deep podcast. On our show we watch three films linked by a word in the title.

    Come find us!
    linktr.ee/sddfilmpodcast

  • Le Samouraï

    Le Samouraï

    ★★★★

    There's something about the style and tone of Jean-Pierre Melville films that is transportive as it is transfixing. The layers of dirt and grime in post-war France scrape away to reveal more profoundly ingrained filth.

    La Samouraï takes the hard-boiled cynicism of Noir pictures but distances itself from its American cousins by limiting our protagonist's dialogue. His silhouette and his actions making more noise than a rambunctious performance ever could. Alain Delon loses himself in this methodical, calculated character whose…

  • Times Square

    Times Square

    ★★★★

    From the immensely satisfying depiction of teen girls fucking shit up, to the gloriously grimy New York of 1979, and from baby-faced Tim Curry to an absolutely bitchin' soundtrack, it astounds me that Times Square isn't a more widely, highly regarded movie.

    Sure, the producers downplayed the more overt, queer elements and poor Allan Moyle walked away before its release, but this movie really does pick up a whole vibe with its bare hands, scoop it into a jar and…

  • Light and the Sufferer

    Light and the Sufferer

    #deep

    Adapted from a short story by that bloke who wrote Motherless Brooklyn, Light and the Sufferer takes a mid-oughts digital camera, a gaggle of driven (yet, godawful) filmmakers, and squanders what is otherwise a super-solid cast.

    As someone who has now seen most of Paul Dano's filmography, I can honestly say that Light and the Sufferer is the worst feature length movie he's been in. The quality has nothing to do with the ultra-low budget, nor the fart-sniffing rumination…

  • Hungry Wives

    Hungry Wives

    ★★★★

    One of those films I enjoyed the first time around and adored the second time around. Man, I wish George A. Romero had made more like it.

    We'll be discussing George A. Romero's Season of the Witch (1973), along with Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) and Season of the Witch (2011) on the February 3rd episode of the Sudden Double Deep podcast. On our show we watch three films linked by a word in the title.

    Come find us!
    linktr.ee/sddfilmpodcast

  • Season of the Witch

    Season of the Witch

    Just insufferably dull from moment one. Season of the Witch is wholly unoriginal and doesn't even boast a Cage-rage performance to sugar-coat the bullshit.

    We'll be discussing George A. Romero's Season of the Witch (1973), along with Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) and Season of the Witch (2011) on the February 3rd episode of the Sudden Double Deep podcast. On our show we watch three films linked by a word in the title.

    Come find us!
    linktr.ee/sddfilmpodcast

  • Welcome Home Brother Charles

    Welcome Home Brother Charles

    ★★★★

    Wait-up... this was a student film?!

    I am bummed that Marlo Monte didn't act in any more films because he really has, "something". There's a heat and hunger in his performance that's just raw, racy and revved-up. His portrayal of Charles in this revenge story is something I could muse on for days. There's a whole lot going on here, and perhaps the more student'centric elements don't wash for some but frankly, I admired the otherworldliness they created.

    As a…

  • Truck Turner

    Truck Turner

    ★★★★

    I'm not sure if Truck Turner is supposed to be as comedic as it is but good fucking lord, what a fun movie. Isaac Hayes teeters between ultimate badass and plank of wood, while Nichelle Nichols absolutely fucking OWNS her role as a revengeful madame.

    I'm still in a daze, struggling to think of my favourite moment of the movie. It's either Nichols' dressing down of her working girls, OR its the poor dude who gets rag-dolled by shotguns. Throw in the soundtrack, the costumes and the impeccable Yaphet Koto in there, and you've got yourself a fine recipe for Blaxploitation awesomeness.

  • Live Like a Cop, Die Like a Man

    Live Like a Cop, Die Like a Man

    ★★

    A bloody movie about bloody blokes, breaking the bloody rules because they're so bloody tough.

    ... Also boobs.

    Yeah, this one's a bit cringe, to say the least. The whole plot plays out like a power fantasy Alan Partridge would have.

  • Planet of the Vampires

    Planet of the Vampires

    ★★

    The only reason this was on my watchlist is due to the amount of film-type people who mention it in discussion with Ridley Scott's Alien. Good fucking grief, those people were talking out of their arse.

    Besides some pretty swish Sixties set design and costuming, Planet of the Vampires is an insufferably dull waste of a concept. I really don't see the appeal in the meandering plot, stiff performances and dry exposition. I was just hoping for something inoffensive but wound up being put to sleep instead.

  • Marlowe

    Marlowe

    ★★★

    I figure this Raymond Chandler adaptation could've only been on my Watchlist because of Bruce Lee.

    This one's a bit of a head-scratcher, as transposing the narrative to a different era seems genius, but unfortunately there's something about the late Sixties that turns this into something akin to the televisual. As if it was the feature length pilot for a tv show, instead of an honest-to-goodness movie.

    James Garner is a bit of a slab of snoozy white meat, while…