Three Colors: Blue ★★

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

This review may contain spoilers.

40/100

Hoped to warm up to this, since I hadn't yet become a Kieslowski fan when I originally saw it (Red turned me around, followed by The Decalogue), but it still seems like an unilluminating wallow, notable mostly for the play of light on Binoche's face and those striking symphonic mid-scene blackouts. Relinquishing everything is inherently undramatic, and Kieslowski's often striking images can't fill the void; nor am I convinced when Julie's discovery of her late husband's adultery suddenly inspires her to reconnect. (The suggestion that his famed compositions were ghosted by her, whatever its thematic relevance, is a serious eye-roller.) And there's no defending the hamfisted symbolism of Julie's mom, addled by dementia, watching bungee-jumpers on TV. I'M FREEEEE, NO I'M NOOOOOT! Jesus christ in my opinion.