Film at Lincoln Center

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For over 50 years, Film at Lincoln Center has been dedicated to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema and enriching film culture. The New York…

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The callow fumbling of wayward young people seeking romantic and professional satisfaction remains an ever-present theme of international cinema, yet Australian director James Vaughan has found entirely new, poignant, and hilarious ways to reveal his characters’ charms and deficits, privileges and blind spots. The story pivots on the failed attempts of freelance videographer Ray (Fergus Wilson) to woo the disinterested Alice (Emma Diaz) during an impromptu camping trip, and the fallout back in Sydney. Vaughan’s ear for the casual cut-down…

Ariadna, a 17-year-old woman working as an international runway model, finds her life interrupted when she is summoned home to her rural Georgian village for her grandmother’s funeral. There, she must deal with her mother’s embittered invective, as well as memories of the deceased, who instilled much confusion and doubt in her as a child. To her surprise, Ariadna is enlisted to carry out an arduous ritual—connecting back to Greek mythology—in which the family’s youngest must guide the soul of…

The feature debut of Greek filmmaker Jacqueline Lentzou confirms the bold formal experimentation and naked emotional interiority promised by her acclaimed shorts such as The End of Suffering (A Proposal). Sofia Kokkali—the star of Lentzou’s previous two works—brings her remarkable physicality to the role of Artemis, a twentysomething who tentatively reunites with her estranged father, Paris (Lazaros Georgakopoulos), after he is diagnosed with a debilitating illness. Instead of traversing familiar dramatic terrain with standard psychological realism, Lentzou relies largely on…

Guided by a humane curiosity and completely lacking in sensationalism, Kateryna Gornostai’s penetrating study of the confusions and beauty of youth takes enormous emotional care as it observes a class of Ukrainian 11th graders over the course of one year. A documentarian with a dramatist’s eye, the director uses a cast of remarkably poised teenagers playing fictional versions of themselves, centering mostly on Masha (a spellbinding Maria Fedorchenko), trying to make sense of the world around her, and the sensitive…

Liked reviews

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

***this is a review of the DIRECTOR'S CUT of Midsommar, and a detailed breakdown of the new footage after the jump***

On July 3, Ari Aster’s “Midsommar” was released on 2,700 screens across the United States. The twisted modern fairy tale —an epic fable that starts with a bleak murder-suicide, and ends with a somewhat brighter one almost 147 minutes later — was an extraordinary ask for a multiplex audience, and Aster knew full well how fortunate he was that…

How refreshing. Denis’s dense and fully fleshed-out conversations, confrontations and intimate moments are such a joy to watch and stick with you. She’s always good.

Zama

Zama

★★★★½

Colonialism Roleplay ASMR - Must Watch Till End!

the first word we hear in ZAMA is "voyeur," an accusation laid against the title character by a group of women he watches bathe on the beach. zama flees as a woman pursues him, only to turn around and strike her down. it is this inciting incident that frames the rest of the film and its perspective on colonialism: not as violence against women persay, but as voyeurism. the indigenous population and…

Zama

Zama

★★★★½

Colonialism as a closed loop. The faces of the generals and the enemies change but the names seem to stay the same, all the while the once proud official slowly deteriorates, his clothes rotting and his mind melting. Martel's rapturous compositions manage to feel cramped even at their most expansive, using intersecting planar blocking to add to the general sense of confusion, of not knowing where to look or what to do. The last third, which leaps ludicrously far away from the preceding material, somehow sharpens the entire feature, bringing its nightmarish logic into crystalline focus.