• Parallel Mothers

    Parallel Mothers

    ★★★½

    Review In A Nutshell:

    Almodóvar insists on us to look into the past, to see how that collective experience shape the people that they are today. Characters are conflicted and disrupted by the melodramatic twists and turns that often give out that Almodóvar flavour, which acts as a roadmap for speculative fiction rather than navigating towards a superfluous climactic event. Playing back and forth with drama and comedy, Parallel Mothers never induced a feeling of numbness to the narrative; interest and fascination were retained throughout.

  • Eternals

    Eternals

    ★★★★

    Review In A Nutshell:

    Where we stand in 2021, Marvel has long surpassed the expectations that the franchise has ambitioned for itself back 13 years ago. Its roster, culture, and history have been formed into a grand mass that an unknowing viewer can find themselves swarmed in depth that would only find itself only expanding as the years go by. Chloe Zhao, of Nomadland fame, seemed to acknowledge the gap that has yet been addressed by the franchise's overarching narrative,…

  • The Last Duel

    The Last Duel

    ★★★½

    Review In A Nutshell:

    I would be lying if I told you that Ridley Scott's The Last Duel didn't prove itself to be a drag in its first set of minutes. It all felt like a demonstration of another tale of a man's strive for nobility in the age of monarchy, something that we have all seen time and time again. However, what struck me was its eventual progression towards a subverted approach. We slowly see the narrative for what…

  • Nitram

    Nitram

    ★★★★

    Review In A Nutshell:

    It would have been far too easy and convenient for Justin Kurzel to have taken Nitram to the same route as many political-biographical stories have demonstrated in the past. He seeks not to enlighten his viewers of the National Firearms Agreement through the recount of the tragedy, but rather provide insight into the wielder of such violence. It opens us up to the fragilities that our titular character has inherited and the collective experiences he has…

  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

    Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

    ★★★★

    Review In A Nutshell:

    At this point, it is very easy to fall under a spell of pessimism when entering upon a Marvel film, as for so much of their content, there is this sameness to their overall presentation, often leaving me feeling rather flat and disengaged. However, Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings was an utter delight. With a brand that intends to sweep one away and escape through escapades of action sequences and larger than life…

  • The Suicide Squad

    The Suicide Squad

    ★★★

    Review In A Nutshell:

    I think the strength of DC in their pursuit for cinematic adaptations of their material has been through the allowance of greater reign they have provided for their respective directors - or at least for some, to an extent. The Suicide Squad, under the helm of James Gunn, is a strong effort for sure. The sense of purpose for its characters and the ideas that it is trying to bring forward do pay off. For a…

  • Dune

    Dune

    ★★½

    Review In A Nutshell:

    Just by holding the novel in your hands and flipping through the pages, one can feel the heft that Frank Herbert's Dune has. Its text is massive both physically and narratively, with a story that invents an entire world that is filled with unique characters, cultures, politics, and ecology. David Lynch, perhaps, understood and resonated with the material, however, in his attempt to adapt it, it felt like he didn't completely understand the assignment. In that…

  • Black Widow

    Black Widow

    ★★½

    Though significantly present and interactive in the MCU, insight and context have always been considered as an afterthought when it comes to the character. We see Black Widow/Natasha Romanoff constantly in action, a critical piece in the progression and success in their plights with her unit, but always placed within the shadow of her more egotistical and celebrated peers.

    The release of Black Widow acts as the perfect (albeit long overdue) opportunity for the character (and the actress herself) to…

  • His Girl Friday

    His Girl Friday

    ★★★½

    Included in Lists:
    Criterion Collection - #849

    Review In A Nutshell:

    I am not going to lie, His Girl Friday is a rapid-fire blast of entertainment. To see its characters loop themselves in these chaotic circumstances and their eventual schemes of emerging out of them brought forth a great feeling of excitement; a quality that attributes to my current score. However, if I peel beyond the layers, what we are treated with is a narrative of a woman who has escaped…

  • The Marriage of Maria Braun

    The Marriage of Maria Braun

    ★★★

    Included in Lists:
    Criterion Collection - #204

    Review In A Nutshell:

    Fassbinder, for The Marriage of Maria Braun, brings forth a character study that shows an individual's great command in attaining and displaying one's own sense of autonomy. The titular character is very well attuned to her desires, intentions, and decisions. Never for a moment does Fassbinder shows any sort of condemnation towards her methodology and personal ambitions, with her male counterparts revealing their possessive, entitled and dishonest natures that further…

  • Fox and His Friends

    Fox and His Friends

    ★★★½

    Included in Lists:
    Criterion Collection - #851

    Review In A Nutshell:

    That signature, dry and frank, sense of storytelling is still found in the narrative formula of Fox and His Friends. Fassbinder frames the story to trace the self-destructive trajectory of its protagonist, Fox, while also providing a subtle commentary on socio-economic relations. As it was throughout for Fox, this film was punishing through and through, and perhaps one that I would urge others to steer away from if they are…

  • House of Bamboo

    House of Bamboo

    Review In A Nutshell:

    There is without hesitation from my end that House of Bamboo displays problematic, but timely, representations of Japanese women; a problem that is amplified by American men who impose their views and values onto them. That being said, Samuel Fuller's venture to create a noir film in Japan is an inspired one. With an archetypal plot that finds an elegant beauty through its usage of the Tokyo landscape, it manages to transcend beyond its inevitable mediocrity,…