Wind

Wind

[No Rating]

Has the same necromantic, creeping feeling that then summits in a climactic burden of horrifying revelation in Jackson's The Lottery (here transmogrified from literature into the motion picture); that then similarly recalls Hungarian director Marcell Iványi's provincial peer in Béla Tarr — that Tarr fingerprint of long-take, slow cinema simultaneously truncated and expanded here in this 7-min short that went on to win the Short Film Palme d'Or in 1996. Produced from the mystique surrounding a real photo taken in 1951 by Lucien Hervé, depicting a trio of women standing on a stone (perhaps ostensible inspiration for that Jackson parallel) walkway in a small, monochromatic village — two looking on at a supposed subject just out of left frame, their face and bodies in profile, while one, face front, body slightly crooked, looks to break the fourth wall. Seeks to ask for answers that a single photograph cannot: of what lies outside the caged frame — with Iványi here doing so by swinging his camera slowly in a 360 pan, beginning and ending with an image of the three onlookers. Here, however, answers can be monstrous. The truth of the photo may be completely innocent, manufactured, or completely facile, but here it is twisted into horror by a student filmmaker in the Academy of Drama and Film in Budapest. If anything, it goes to show how the simplest of images can suggest a secret, illusory dread.