Favorite films

  • Bringing Up Baby
  • Three Colors: Red
  • Au Hasard Balthazar
  • Out of the Past

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  • Aguirre, the Wrath of God

    ★★★★★

  • Collateral

    ★★★★

  • Cairo Station

    ★★★★

  • Gone Baby Gone

    ★★★½

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  • Village Rockstars

    Village Rockstars

    ★★★★

    A coming of age story in essence, we are introduced to a free-spirited young girl, Dhunu, through the dynamics of her relationship with her mother, with nature and her dream of owning a guitar and forming a band with the boys she hangs around with.

    Much of the film follows the children being children, lounging on trees, hanging out in the fields and pretend playing music with instruments made out of styrofoam. The tone is light despite touching on some…

  • The Wind Will Carry Us

    The Wind Will Carry Us

    ★★★★½

    A quietly introspective film on humanity, life and death. By choosing to eliminate certain characters or objects central to the narrative altogether from being physically present onscreen, Kiarostami evokes a world where the complexities of life and spiritual contemplations are rightfully recognised as existing beyond the limits of what can be effectively captured in the frame. 

    The compositions are gorgeous, with mostly tonal affinity in hues of orange for shots of the mountains and outskirts of the village, while greater…

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  • Aguirre, the Wrath of God

    Aguirre, the Wrath of God

    ★★★★★

    An incredible film. A simplistic story that doesn’t seem much if put into words, except why tell when you can show. A kind of visual poetry that juxtaposes the desire of men for wealth and power against the insurmountable, primal forces of nature. Striking imagery and sound choices sets an otherworldly mood, inducing a hypnotic experience that pulls you in despite the brutality of the journey and that a madman leads it to impending doom.

  • Gone Baby Gone

    Gone Baby Gone

    ★★★½

    Gone Baby Gone has the makings of a gripping mystery. It builds that way right about until the middle, but then the plot twists and it becomes apparent the narrative MacGuffins the disappearance of a child to touch on underlying issues such as parental neglect and the conundrum of doing something for the greater good even if it means defying the law. The theme and characters become heavy-handed in ethical virtuosity to a point you can see where it’s heading as the climatic resolution becomes perfunctory, even if it’s the one saves the film from becoming a hard-boiled morality play.

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  • Bringing Up Baby

    Bringing Up Baby

    ★★★★★

    In Bringing Up Baby, Howard Hawks made a creative choice that he eventually regretted, mainly as a result of the poor box office performance at the time of its release. He felt in making all the characters whacky in their own way, there was no anchor for some form of normalcy in the midst of the absurdity and for the audience to relate to.

    Thank god he went with his first instinct because the end product is nothing short of the…

  • Three Colors: Blue

    Three Colors: Blue

    ★★★★½

    Being someone who loves films with visual styles that are particularly attuned to mood, emotion and dramatic subtext, this was quite the treat. From the arresting opening sequence to the multitudes of parallels drawn between the blue tints in the lighting and glaring use of orchestral music to establish the connection to the past and the suppression of grief, there is plenty that is incredibly inventive and interesting cinematically. If I’m being picky, the subplot with the mistress and using…