AD917

I'm just making this all up as I go along.

Favorite films

  • The Night of the Hunter
  • Nashville
  • Psycho
  • The General

Recent activity

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  • The Affairs of Dobie Gillis

    ★★★

  • Modern Times

    ★★★★½

  • The Third Man

    ★★★★★

  • Flying Down to Rio

    ★★★

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  • The Affairs of Dobie Gillis

    The Affairs of Dobie Gillis

    ★★★

    I was expecting an Andy Hardy type affair, but this is surprisingly amoral for a 50’s comedy about college kids. Dobie cuts class, plagiarizes essays, blows up a chemistry lab, scams his classmates into paying admission for a concert they don’t want to attend, and just generally displays disrespect for the traditions and authorities of the institution in which he is enrolled. 

    No lessons are learned, and all consequences are avoided. 

    It’s almost like a kinder, gentler early version of Animal House. But instead of John Belushi peeping through windows we get Bob Fosse doing dance routines. Still an equally horny film either way.

  • Modern Times

    Modern Times

    ★★★★½

    Heartwarming stuff as Chaplin’s Tramp harasses his co-workers, joins the Communist Party, gets high on cocaine, commits several petty larcenies, assaults police officers, and shacks up with an underage girl. 

    How did any of this ever make it past the Breen office?

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  • The Third Man

    The Third Man

    ★★★★★

    As good a film as has ever been made. 

    Amidst the wreckage of postwar Vienna a writer of pulp westerns is forced to leave behind the black and white morality of his cheap novels and confront a crumbling world of deep shadows and grey rubble where there is no question of right or wrong, just how much wrong one is willing to live with. 

    It’s American idealism vs European pragmatism; the naïveté of those who observed the war from afar picked apart by the tempered reality faced by those who experienced it firsthand. 

    I’m stunned every time I see it.

  • The Thing

    The Thing

    ★★★★★

    Screened in memory of Ennio Morricone. I dare say this isn’t one of the titles that springs immediately to mind when listing the late maestro’s greatest scores, but it does highlight that he was capable of great versatility. Here he creates a John Carpenter score for a John Carpenter movie. It is “music that disappears” as the director likes to put it; it becomes a part of the environment. I doubt it would play well on its own away from…