Alexander Powell

Alexander Powell

Filmmaker, Videographer, Synthesist Enthusiast.

Favorite films

  • It's Such a Beautiful Day
  • Blue Velvet
  • Conspirators of Pleasure
  • All About My Mother

Recent activity

All
  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

    ★★

  • Avengers: Infinity War

    ★★★½

  • Annihilation

    ★★★★

  • Mission: Impossible - Fallout

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

    Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

    Martin McDonagh has opted to invoke a distinct sense of place in this film that ultimately doesn't work and contradicts the lazy rendering of Middle America and the mid-west he's trying to build (things like placing the film in a non-existent town in Missouri and then shooting in North Carolina). Geographical reduction of the U.S. from a British filmmaker aside, this trivia serves as a microcosm for the many ways this film paints in overly broad strokes for the sole…

  • Avengers: Infinity War

    Avengers: Infinity War

    Since "Age of Ultron," I was exhausted from this franchise and it's laborious efforts to stitch together it's cinematic universe. It felt like a massive network tv show was being managed across a dozen films, so I had to take a break. Between that and this film, I saw "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2," "Spiderman: Homecoming," and "Black Panther" (all wonderful and distinctively unique voices entered into the Marvel Universe). I was expecting to be tired and bored from…

Popular reviews

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  • Mobile Men

    Mobile Men

    ★★★★

    This is a really great short, especially in the larger context of Weerasethakul's documentation of people and rituals throughout his home of Thailand. Male friendship, masculinity, and homoeroticism all intertwine in this brief, energetic car ride as the three men barrel down the road yelling out to each other and the world. It strikes a certain nerve you hope to hit in a short experimental art film.

  • Annihilation

    Annihilation

    A group of scientists go on an exploration I can best describe as "Stalker" meets "Under the Skin," "Annihilation" gives us an unsettling look into our own contradicting urges to self-sabotage and self-destruct using the physical environment breaking down around around the cast through cell mutation and light refraction. With a really strong root in the science groundwork it builds, "Annihilation" succeeds in building its atmosphere and tone on these thematic motifs in some very affecting, visceral ways through blending…