Robert

Rating since September 2013.

Favorite films

  • Embrace of the Serpent
  • Mommy
  • Ida
  • A Single Man

Recent activity

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  • Hit the Road

    ★★★★½

  • Red Rocket

    ★★★½

  • The Crusade

    ★★★

  • Murina

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Hit the Road

    Hit the Road

    ★★★★½

    Panahi knocks it out of the ballpark with his no less than sublime debut. Following in the footsteps of his father in terms of social and political rage, but creating his own unique style altogether. Playing out with the same moments of genuine laugther like indie hit Little Miss Sunshine (2007), but ultimately more angry. The dialogue is sharp and poetic. Its four-headed ensemble is extraordinary, with the youngest family member as the obvious standout. There are multiple memorable scenes…

  • Red Rocket

    Red Rocket

    ★★★½

    In this fitting addition to Baker’s realism oeuvre, he again shows the dire state the USA is in, without leaning to heavily into despair. The casting of Simon Rex plays out perfectly. His overacting, comic timing and charisma help to both love and despise his character. The emotional weight is added through both Lexi and her mother, who perfectly illustrate a mayor part of American society disillusioned by life. The downfall of Lonnie might be the most sobering moment. The film fails to completely get under your skin, but it nevertheless gives an intriguing sense of place.

Popular reviews

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  • Hereditary

    Hereditary

    ★★★½

    Hereditary can be split into two parts. The first part plays like a family drama, and a wonderfully acted one by Collette, Wolff and Byrne that is. Sure there are some spooky elements (and some ‘are you serious!?’ parts too), but it’s these grieving family members that grab your attention here. Watch out for this terrific dinner scene. Than the second part comes along and things start to get messy. The spiritual angle works to an extent, but Hereditary is…

  • Foxtrot

    Foxtrot

    ★★★★½

    A gripping exploration of grief and the uselessness of war, told in three segments. The first segment makes for a very intense and captivating opener. Ashkenazi grabes hold of your attention and doesn’t let go. The second segment feels a bit too slow pazed, but succesfully builds the stage for an emotional and brilliantly acted conclusion. The cinematography is gorgeous. Especially the dancing soldier scene and the animated sequence are stunners.

    Unlike so many other war movies, Foxtrot shows the devastation of war without any fighting, which makes the story even more relatable.